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were starting to notice senior advisers all the way down. i remember talking to john dell staccato. he is the d so he was a consultant and he was saying what inspired him about this footage was needless stuff we have been shooting but senator obama had reported a birthday message to a staffer just because they weren't able to be on the trail and he wanted to make sure that she would have a happy birthday. i don't know if she did i don't know but after seeing it, this was so cool and authentic a wonderfully get to videos like this incorporating the backstage element into more visual media so the hybrid of this plus the standard commercial ended up being like the austin caucus spot i believe is what it was written as. and we did tons of these because we like liked this so much. >> are we ready now? >> the next president of the united states, barack obama. >> we have got a chance to make history in january 3. be a part of it. make showed to show up to caucus. let's go change the world. [applause] nice t-shirt. >> given enough time on camera any person who deals with it, this is a great ex
dealt with the commerce clause issue yes, five of them including john roberts said it exceeds the bet exceeds the power because it is so unusual. in other words they didn't cast down a month to meet the among the president's. they gave congress the power under the understanding of the commerce clause so there is a sense in which it me be one of to the of the calls could be more important but we just don't know. we will have to see. so, my time is up and i am really sorry that i had to do my signing before because i had to catch a plane so i won't see you at the signing table but thank you very much for coming. [applause] said that even a part of the 2011 national book festival here in washington, d.c.. to find out more, visit loc.gov/bookfest. jeffrey to the reports on the relationship which in the obama administration and the u.s. supreme court. the author exam of the recent addition of the four justices in the past five years and how it has affected the court's decisions on the numerous cases including its recent ruling on health care. it's about an hour. [applause] thank you. hello
, remember? [laughter] geek out for appointments because chief justice warren left. john hartman and hugo black left. they were replaced by richard nixon with chief justice warren burger, harry blackmun, powell, and william rehnquist. and as you think about that list, it illustrates a theme that a think, it's a very important part of "the oath" but it is the theme of american politics over the past generation. and that is the evolution of the republican party. it is the most important story in american politics. it is the most important story in the supreme court. because modern republicans dominate the supreme court for two generations, and moderate republicans are gone. they are gone at the supreme court. they are gone in the united states congress. arlen specter as you all know is fighting for his life now. i had the privilege of covering senator specter who is a great character. often during his long tenure in the senate, and he left the republican party literally, but republican party had left him well before that. and as you look at nixon's appointments to the supreme court, 1970, t
nominee for president in 2012. governor john said, when and why did you leave the republican party and become a libertarian? >> you know, i've probably been a libertarian my entire life. this is just kind of coming out of the closet. i don't think i am unlike most americans. i think there's a lot more americans in this country that declare themselves libertarians as opposed to voting libertarian. so the picture and trying to make right now is vote libertarian with me this one time. give me a shot at changing things. and if it does somewhere, you can always return to tyranny and i'm going to argue that so so we have right now. >> what are the seven principles of good government you read about? >> one as being reality-based. just find out what his wife, base your decision inactions i'm not. make sure everybody that knows -- that should know what you're doing, knows what you're doing, so communicate. don't hesitate to deliver bad news. there's always time to fix things. if you don't have a job you love enough to get richer job done, quit and get one that she do that. it elledge mistak
her accident on securing the worlder, john lewis on excise tax when it comes to the telephones. so i have a long list, a long career and history of working with both sides of the aisle because i believe at the end of the day if we're going to solve the problems facing this nation, facing the state of nevada -- high unemployment, high foreclosures, businesses going bankrupt -- if you're going to solve those problems, republicans and democrats are going to have to come together to solve those problems. >> moderator: congressman berkeley, you have a minute. berkeley: i think it's important we do work together, and on many issues we co. do. one of the things i recall working across party lines was for the elimination of the estate tax. i worked with mr. brady who sits on the ways and means committee with me. that's also crossing party lines and breaking with my own party to make sure that we do what i think is right for the american people. um, b one of the issues that's very important that we talk about a lot is jobs and making sure that we provide an environment where we can create goo
back from the dead immediate control of the congress. john boehner is the speaker of the house. john boehner realizes that he has to confront his own people if he is going to save the credit rating them back on moody's and save it from downgrade. this is going to be a political disaster. john boehner can fill in the back of his scalp that this is going to be burning on the republicans. he feels political blame but it's also worried about the country. two hearts -- two heartbeats away from the downgrade. and so, he does something extraordinary. he acts like a leader. he comes up with a compromise. that is a political possibility from where he sits and he finds out a way to close loopholes and raise some $800 billion in new revenue. that should be enough to make a deal with the president of the united states. and he manages to come to a deal. even shake hands. and they can feel history, the wind of history at their back. and then we will reform entitlement. the vice president is deeply involved. at the very moment that they are making this deal and they shake hands, obama suddenly gets
, and patrick and it would involve. we really appreciate it if we are glad to get you out. and john is here. some people are saying they wanted styling advice. there he is. goes it with them. thanks a lot. >> thank you. [applause] >> its significance to the store of uncle tom's cabin is that many ways the story begins here. it's here in this pew, pew number 23, that harriet beecher stowe, by her account, saw a vision of uncle tom being whipped to death. now, uncle tom as you probably know is the title character, the hero of her 1852 novel, uncle tom's cabin. uncle tom's cabin was written in very much a protest novel to slave law that anyone in the know if, on the abolitionist lived, if anyone in the north was to aid or abet a fugitive slave, they themselves would be imprisoned or fined for breaking the law. this was a slave law by which a scene of a compromise between the north and south to war. so that was part of what the novel trying to do so, look, i made person and i'm against slavery as was most of them in the. and right to help a slave to find him or herself in our borders. we have t
hear what he said. all of a sudden is to me there would changed voice turned harsh, john muscles tighten soaring toward a chris endo, swinging his arms, and then the storm will pass. [applause] the sun would return. the jurors would relax. congeal engaging. he never addressed juries, he said carries but to them. it was all about contact. very important to american legal proceeding and history. judges and prosecutors do their duty. they were there to exact vengeance and to safeguard property. but darrow believed that juror's commit given the opportunity and a skillful enough invitation could be persuaded to look past the legal particular, judge defendant in the context of his time, situational factors that prompt behavior. he sought to make even the most serious of crimes comprehensible he talked about human beings and the difficulties of life and the futility of human planning, the misfortunes of the accused, the strange workings of fate and chance that had landed this porcelain trouble. he would try to make the jury understands not so much the case as the defendant, and it was n
. >> primarily senator old ridge was the only one not a banker. he was spearheading. >> the father-in-law to john rockefeller. >> he is tied in closely with the banking industry and the industrial complex. a wealthy guy in his own right. probably the most political figure in the united states short of the president who was wood row will sob in those days. the rest guys are bankers and they represented the din city of jpmorgan and the rockefeller dynasty. they had connections. they were connectioned to the roth childs in england. and max there. there was. he had connections to the brother max who was the head of the banks that banking consortium in germany and the nether land. we have a international group here, really. representing international people. and it was the e peed my of the bad bankers of the world theeps were quites. what happened is they knew that there was going to be a move to control banking. they knew that congress was going to pass some kind of haw to regulate banking. instead of being stupid and sitting back and saying i hope they don't too bad. they decided to take the lead. t
with john connally, governor of texas and his wife, once the sweetheart of the university of texas and still a very beautiful woman. the car behind them is a heavily armored secret service car with agents standing on the running boards and with automatic rifles down between the seats and the third car is lyndon johnson's car. he is writing in the back, right side. lady bird in the center and in the senator from texas on the left. in the front is a secret service man named rufus yarborough. johnson's cars in the motorcade of thousands of books have been written about the assassination. they concentrate on what happened to jack kennedy. not one went into detail in what i considered an adequate way, substantial detail about what was happening to lyndon johnson. what was happening from his point of view. the assassination had never been told from johnson's point of view. it came to me when i was doing this book that we have to do that. how do you do that? first you interview people who are still alive. john connolly himself is very helpful to me. he had this great ranch in south texas with a sta
. >> "eminent outlaws" is published. go ahead caller. >> caller: i wanted to know if john is still writing. john reggie. he had a book that got a lot of attention oh, back in the 50s, it was called the city is of night. has he done anything recently? >> he is still writing. he is still working and living in l.a. i cannot remember the last titles that he di .. book is city of night, which was published in the early 1960s, really important book. he later did, what we got to see, numbers, and he did a number called a sexual outlaw, which is kind of one of the influxes from my title, "eminent outlaws." it combines the title from the administration and the sexual outlaw by john reggie. the more recent work isn't as strong as his early work. >> christopher, christopher barm, are a lot of gay writer's political? >> guest: i think they are whether they want to be or not. they didn't know that they have no choice. some are more political than others. larry kramer is a case in point. some people say he is one, politics is more important to him in than good prose, but is very committed to politics. tony ku
order. we're talking about international institutions. john has written the most serious threat to american national security today is not as specific enemy but the erosion of the institutional foundation of the global order that the united states has commanded for half a century. so he sees the constitutions of the global order is being essential to the strength. jessica has written, our infrastructured, gridlocked politics is having a major impact abroad on other countries perceptions of u.s. influence and power. and of course, on the desire account of the u.s. example. taking the first of these, bob, and the challenge that is posed the use in terms of influence by the strength or lack of strength or current state of international institutions, what do you see out there that worries you in terms of the institutional structure in the world order right now? >> well, yawn and i have a -- john and i have old say subtle argument about this in the sense that my view is that . >> this is no place for subtle. >> i know. i'm going try to move past it as quickly as possible. [laughter]
only been in office decouple years there is already rumors of the vice presidential candidate for john kerry. apparently vilsack and the staff went to secretary of agriculture they thought they were both interviewed but she said she was not abetted by the campaign. here is a democrat they forgot they had more democrats but the press does not have historical memory so this was an anomaly father with the ohio connection she captured the national attention very quickly and with showcase her at conventions but by 2008 she was a serious contender for price president pro when she endorsed obama that also moved up her stock. she was one of the last three or four people obama was considering. there were things against her. she is not an exciting speaker. it was not a bill clinton's speech. very measured. levying off of the teleprompter. saw lead information off the cuff she is different. she is savaged with the press and i actually brought up clip of jonge to work -- jon stewart on "the daily show" lampooning the speech she gave in response to the president bush "state of the union." it was no
>> thank you, john. in nevada school districts recently laid off seven teachers a year. some of the best teachers for classroom. in michigan, school districts are spending over a quarter of their budget on retirement benefits. and in wisconsin, property taxes went up every year for the past decade. why? the answer can be summed up in two words, government unions. unions use their power to press government to put their interests first. in contract negotiations unions always insist on seniority-based layouts and this gives guaranteed job security to senior members. but it also means the school districts are forced to lay off the new hires first even if those teachers are star performers. parents object but the unions have decided they can accept that. the unions also want understandably bear generation retirement benefits for their members. in michigan 27% of school districts budgets provide pensions and health benefits and it's not hard to see what. is a state can retire after 25 years on the job and collect full benefits i have a lot of teachers retire in their late 40s or ea
tv.org. >> michael brick recounts in academic year at john h. reagan high school in texas and profiles the school's principal, anabel garza, and many teachers, students and staff. the author recounts the school's new closure in 2008 and its subsequent turnaround. this is about 45 minutes. .. >> i just can't thank you all enough, those of you, you know who i'm talking to for letting me into your lives and havi the courage to share this story with the world. you wouldn't know it to look over here, but public education is our most pressing political, social and moral problem. everybody knows it, and positions are entrenched, and there's a lot of hot rhetoric on all sides. somehow we've gotten to a point where frustration has built to such a fever pitch, that we've turned on teachers as the villains and started shutting down schools all over the country. as a writer after a good story to tell, i went looking in the pressure cooker of a public high school working against the clock to raise test scores. i wanted to take a look at what we're throwing away in this big national purge. instead, i found a d
it this spring in the health care case. john marshall famously declared that is what the power and the duty of the court to say what will law is and that was an expression of his understanding that the power of the judicial review is inherent in our constitutional system and that wasn't self-evident at all. so that is the power of jurisdiction, limits on jurisdiction that somebody has to have a standing at one its jurisdiction. that's another thing the court basically made up. other courts won't necessarily have that. a few years ago to give very interesting kind of judicial trip to south africa which is a fabulous constitution, modern constitution and a wonderful supreme court. the south african constitution gives people all kinds of positive rights of the right to housing and education and a right to health and its job and all this. our constitution of course doesn't. our constitution is of - rights, the government shall not in the bill of rights the government shall not. it's against the power of the government. south africa constantly rights they have no limit the supreme court has no l
that there is a war going on, not just in the democratic party, but the republican perhaps much more intense. john boehner is trying to work a deal with the president to do tax reform and entitlement reform and his deputy, the majority leader, calls people like paul ryan, who is now running for vice president. .. >> if you keep doing this, you are going to risk your speakership. the president said when i talked to him, interestingly enough, he said in fixing -- he realizes the magnitude of all of this, as does speaker boehner, key democrats, key republicans realize what it is. and the president literally said to me, i would willingly lose an election if i could solve these problems. it is that serious. tim geithner, the treasury secretary, in the book is quoted thousands of words telling the president, you have got to do something about this problem. we have to fix it. you literally, it's not that we're going to close down the government, we will close down the american economy and, in turn, the global economy. if they do not solve the issue of this runaway spending, get some way to stop borrowing
to 1977. legislative assistant to senator john denver from 1979 to 81. from 81-82 he served as assistant secretary for civil rights in the u.s. department of education and is chairman of the u.s. equal opportunity commission from 1982 to 1990. he became a judge of the u.s. court of appeals in district of columbia circuit and 1990 and president bush nominated him as associate justice of the supreme court and he took his seat on october 203rd 1991. please welcome justice thomas and professor mark to the stage. [applause] >> thank you, ladies and tennant love for that extra nearly gracious, warm welcome. thank you for the national archives and the staff for making this event possible. thanks also, special thanks to the federalist society and the constitutional accountability center and thank you, justice thomas and off for being with us today as we mark the 225th birthday of our constitution. i guess i would like to start that conversation with the words the constitution starts with. we, the people. what that phrase means to you, how that freeze has changed over time thanks to the amendment
john cline was the president of cnn and said we will put you on tv right now. i was overwhelmed. the first time i did not know what i was supposed to be. then i found my center i was supposed to me me. it was like landing in russia up. a culture shock. i learned a lot about myself and people with their consumption of the news. >> on the topic of wealth and the source for learning do you think we have that level of wealth people would still have a thirst for learning? the field that is mess it -- missing there has never been a society we have been consumed i remember growing up iacocca said quality is job born now we make nothing. if you complain about something i complained about delta air lines. [laughter] you used to be able to complain dominos 30 minutes or its free. there was a level of pride and commitment. you have to work twice as hard to go have as far. even though you felt it would be hard but it was for the truth but i don't think we tell people what is expected. terrorist attack the country and they said go shopping than wait to. they're past be a place you're not it
. not really. >> host: john and mean joins on the independent line. good morning, john. >> caller: good morning. how are you? >> host: are you watching tomorrow night? >> caller: i will be watching but i'm a student of human nature, really. that's all. politicians will always be politicians so i am not a fanatic on either side. i think i'm just watching to see how it goes. promises don't mean nothing because without the senate or the congress they don't mean nothing. if they are not backed up they don't mean nothing. but it's nice to watch and see what they will promise. they will probably promise anything. like i said, i am from an old school of politics. i was brought up in new york at the tail end of the hall if you know what that was. anyway, i've just been watching out of curiosity on how they present themselves more and more out of anything else. i don't have another particular party or anything like that. thank you. >> host: paul chollet vince and hedge phill wv on the republican line. good morning, paul. >> caller: good morning. what i am concerned about is the moderator. you know, duri
with civil rights of the '60s. >> host: john is from illinois now. john is an independent. hi there. >> caller: hi. mr. johnson, the only problem i have is about the tax issue. and the reason why it's like -- the reason why i say that is, our taxes in this country have never been set at actually to be fair. what they were set up for originally was that the rich were supposed to pay the majority of their taxes in federal taxes, and the working class and the poor were supposed to pay most of -- the majority of theirs in home owners taxes, city and state taxes. and that has been all -- it's got everything out of sorts. my problem with what everybody calls a fair tax is, when you're on a fixed income, and these states are going to have to have such a high tax rate because the federal government is going to have such a lower one, that when anybody that is on a fixed tax rate goes in and buys a refrigerator, they cost $400, the lowest one they can buy, they have about $100 tax on the refrigerator. that is the problem. and the only ones it's going to hurt is people that are retired, people
you do? >> that's a great question. i think that for me the experience i have, i supported john mccain and his a great man and a true american hero. [inaudible] >> seriously, seriously. >> it was because of you. president obama wins the election in a month after he gets sworn in, he comes to florida to talk about the recovery act, and the stimulus. the office invited me to greet them in fort myers and i did so and introduced them. as a governor, i saw our budget into what was happening to our economy. it was on a cliff and i was very delighted frankly as a governor to have the balanced budget or go to jail that we were going to get assistance. a lot of the sort of taxpayer dollars are going to come back to florida and help us out of this thing and help our teachers, police, firefighters be able to stay on the job. but when i did that and embrace the president at that time, maybe the president of the united states. and the way my mother and father raised by three sisters and myself was that you respect others, does she do unto others, particularly, by the way, if that person happens
. wait for the mic. [inaudible] >> is it on? a great press conference. i am john, president of the foundation west virginia. also a person long-term recovery and i've been clean and sober for over 30 years. [applause] i got clean when i was 23 in the marine corps so i have seen a lot of action in recovery over 30 years but in virginia specifically not all states are equal. we still fight civil rights in virginia and we have a state where they want to go backward it appears. now the federal government is doing a great job intervening in the delivery of recovery support services, meaning those federal dollars the come from virginia. to me it would make sense to make them spend a small portion on recovery support services to include housing. housing is a critical missing element in recovery so i guess my thought process to samhsa and somehow force the state to discriminate against recovery like they do in virginia and spend some of those dollars on the authentic recovery and support service. that really is the nature of my thought process. by doing so we could really reduce the
whatever weapons we can. >> thank you, john. let's give john wohlstetter i hand. [applause] .. whenever it is you are watching i appreciate that. always told by my wife and daughter after presenting some earlier remarks, i should make it much shorter which i will try to do. my hope is to talk for about 15, no longer than 20 minutes and reserve a lot of time for the questions and commentss and counterarguments that not only do eyes the suspect some of you have but i know given some people in this room i know without a shadow of a doubt i welcome. this is, we are told, the most important election in our lifetime and it may be that more people believe that this year than believe in 2008-2004-2004 another election where that is regularly said. for this to be true, among other things elections must have genuine consequences for the making of public policy particularly with regard to domestic policy. we could have separate conversation about the issue of presidential power with regard to foreign policy, military policy but let me say my primary interest in the book and my remarks this evening
that we think that as americans, not as republicans or democrats, that as americans, -- john and i were on appropriations together. why are their partisan issues? job is to get data and call witnesses are dead what you have partisan shaping us. why do you have leaders getting to choose who gets to sit on what committee in exchange for promising to go along with the party lines? why do we allow that to happen? well, the first part is the easy part. you can change the laws about primaries and you can change the laws about redistricting. in order to change the internal workings and the rules of congress, who can be the speaker, who and how a speaker can act. the only way to do it is to do what you are all doing tonight. when you are a congressman or senator or state legislature, show up at a meeting, be there and demand that they change. so many members of congress, the number of members of congress who vote with their party 95% of the time. if you build your party 95% of the time, you're not voting with your brain. you are not voting with your constituents. you are voting with your party.
answered that. it was congressman john lewis. when we finished talking, i decided to check my text messages because i couldn't keep voice mail clear enough to keep getting messages, and low and behold, there was a message from the white house saying the president was trying to reach me. i called the number, and they wanted to arrange the call so -- interesting these people in the media, the person who was in the car with me from cnn started going in her purse to pull out a cam corder. i said you cannot tape me while i'm talking to the president. i made her turn it off, and made her put that away. [applause] he started out by saying you're a hard person to reach. well, everyone knew i'd been with cnn all week. i didn't say that to him though. [laughter] anyway, he started out saying, you know, vilsack would be calling me about a position they wanted to offer, and then he said, you know, those issues you've been putting out there all week i'm well aware of them. i said, no, you don't understand those issues the same way i do. we went back and forth. i didn't really -- you know, i'm talking to
was john legend to the small concert i can't remember what the town laws, but it was not a large city and he was in columbus and cleveland for the county seat and the reason he went there was that they had seen the registration numbers were lacking in this particular area and that to reach the registration goal which the disaggregate it from the state down to this particular piece of turf they had him do towards the registration right here for the city hall or whoever to go in there wasn't that they send john legend and to persuade people but they turned him in to turn people out and that's happened broadway's everywhere server will biggest it's rare talking about in october were there competing with each campaign will be competing differently in each of them based on their vocals which are coming out of those microtargeting predictions which they think every person is considering the manner the target and they are taking every man of people that they think are as persuade the ball and that is informing where the candidate goes to read as a reviewer to -- i know it is hard to predict
campaign there was one little example john legend did a small concert i don't remember what the town was but it's not a large city. he was in columbus and cleveland it was a county seat and the reason he went there is they had seen the registration numbers for lagging in this particular area and to reach the registration goals which the head disaggregate it from the state down to this particular piece of turf they had him do a concert oriented registration the city hall or people could go and register and it wasn't that they send john legend to turn people out, and that's happening in broadway everywhere and so there will be states we're talking about at the end of october where they are competing but each will be competing differently and each of them based on their vocals which are coming out of those microtargeting prevention's which are taking every name of every individual person they think is already supporting them and considering the target taking every name of people they think of as purse readable and that is informing the tv buys, but the candidate goes, the male and every
that this is the most effective ad, and john of abc said that got four pinocchios, so the response as well, we are not going to let our campaign be dictated by fact checkers. and what he means by that, i mean, politicians in both parties stretch the truth if they feel it will give them a political advantage. and if that's their most effective ad, it doesn't matter what a bunch of, you know, nick take a journalist might say about it because that add news people and has an impact. i have seen both obama and romney suddenly tweaked or change language, or drop language that were called out by fact checkers because ultimately there was a decision that are that it doesn't really mean that much to us if we fix this. it will get less greece if we just tweak it a bit or change it on the margins. but the key thing that moves voters such as he apologizes for america, or obama with a ridiculous thing about the savings from the wars, which he says, and the same breath criticizes george w. bush for running wars on the credit card, he will say those like almost 1 cents after another without any since he is c
of vantage for john mccain, but the polls coming out of pennsylvania again and again show is not doing any better than-15. so basically the state is looking very similarly in terms of its to graphics how the demographics trail for the political support as it did in 2008. the same thing applies to the geographical distribution. you look at how obama is running in the suburbs, similar to how he ran in 2008 and so on. so definitely looking like advantage obama in pennsylvania. michigan is another state where the romney campaign thought they might have iran. this is not happening. michigan is pretty decisively on the side of obama. the geographical pattern of the vote. about as well in the edge for a mature area. the statewide vote in 2008. they're just not much going on there. wisconsin is a state where obviously if there were going to crack the midwest given what's happening with ohio they thought perhaps they could do it in wisconsin. the problem is twofold for them, i think. if you look at the level of demographic change that has taken place in wisconsin, it's actually quite startling acco
in this race, mitt romney would have to get double john mccain's margin of 18 points among the white working class in this election. that's youth turnout doesn't change among minority's despite the shifts in eligible voters. if this does get realize, let's say minority vote share goes up by couple of points, 26% as was in 2008 to 28% in 2012, and again if the white college graduate and minority support stays about the same, it means mitt romney would have to get north of 40-point margin among white working-class voters to actually win the election, to win the popular vote. so let's take look at where we are now based on a reasonable came out. it's the gold standard for polls. a pew research center. no one else -- no offense to anyone else in the room who has april. they really do it right. it's pretty reliable stuff. they give you a lot of interesting demographic breaks tradition as among likely voters that obama is leading now by eight points. if you look at the average of the national polls as a bit high relative to the average. the average has been running about four-point. if you look at
with that once you have? how do you, as john mentioned earlier, how do you make that actionable for not only industry, but for the general public? so where is the why should i care in there? dazzler tried to do through this education campaign, he developed a why you should be concerned and why you should take the necessary steps to protect yourself. don't expect someone else to protect you. the focus there and a cyber domain is protecting yourself. >> let me add to that, because i think most people in america, probably not industry but i think the average american would be shocked to know that dhs is responsible for protecting.gov governments they could have the authority and responsibly to protect dot gov. .mil. what government agency has responsibility to protect dot com. matters not a government -- if a foreign government dropped a bomb on some company headquarters here, the nazis would probably scramble planes and the present would be on the phone with some had a state somewhere. but when the same company gets hacked and loses two terabytes of data, $1 billion worth of r&d to continue ta
for re-election, particularly the house republican leadership to be really specific about it, can john boehner in the time he's running for re-election as leader say i'm going to make a deal with barack obama that includes big tax increases? >> that's a good question. so i was -- i was informed recently of a conversation that a leading player on taxes who, you know, is now on k street, but whose background is on the democratic side, and a counterpart of his on the republican side. in the conversation, the republican said the democrats have to cave on taxes because john boehner can't move his caucus before january 1st, but the president can roll over before january 1st once he is re-elected so that is what has to happen. to us, it's a prescription to never get anywhere. the hope is that after the election, the discussion proceeds in such a fashion that there can be agreement in december, but i think the very point you mentioned about boehner is one of the reasons why i believe it is more likely that we will get a deal in january than in december for precisely the point you just mentione
leadership. can john boehner at the time is running for reelection of its leaders say, i'm going to make a deal with barack obama to include retracting? >> that's a good question. so i was informed recently of a conversation that a leading plater on tax, who is now on k street, but his background is more on the democratic side with the counterparty on the republican side. the conversation will have to cave on taxes because john boehner can't move his caucus before january 1st, but once he gets really did that is what will have to happen. i think for many of us, we see this as a prescription to never get anywhere. the hope is that after the election the discussion proceeds in such a fashion that there can be agreement in december. but i think the very point you mentioned is one of the reasons why i believe it is more likely that we would get a deal in january than in december for precisely the point you just mentioned about honor and the elections and house. the mac let me broaden the elections. i should state more clearly. the bottom-line question is what does it take the house republica
to come up with stanford for much harder graduated and promote jim and john denver graduated, but starting quarterback in the super bowl. then last one is really hard but have given you a clue. have already said his last name. benjamin harrison who matriculated at miami university of ohio and who is a quarterback , been in office burger of that team purpose per that shall not otherwise be named. so that's a little presidential trivia for you, and i also always give a little mix and stir when i come back. thinking to prepare my remarks when latter is being built. sandino's as well as i do. the real director of the nixon library was richard nixon. he designed and oversaw it and every detail was of interest to him. but probably the thing he was least interested in was a room which is even here anymore, the domestic policy room which has been redone. the league kind of such a together at the last minute. one of those exhibits was about the endangered species act. president nixon as you may or may not know, greatest of a terminal president in the history of the united states son and heir the cl
against the majority, to protect the minority against the majority. and his colleague, john jay goes one step further. shape in the first president of the constitutional congress, later supreme court justice. he said those that own the country ought to go. so i think we have to see that the origins of this kind of a monopoly capitalism go back right to the very roots of the country. >> the irony though is the system of some of his sharpest analects and critics understood is full of contradictions. it is important to be understood not to be arguing because i don't believe that, but this is a system that, for example, somehow solve this problems and presented the united states that can't be overcome, but the system is now so well defended that any hope of changing it is delusional. i don't believe that for one minute. this is a system full of all kinds of problems that it can't solve it is patently obvious. i heard it mentioned one. it doesn't want these crazies over time. these are times of trouble. in times of crisis, people are asking questions, which give opportunity for people like me
. >> you're watching booktv. >> now john wohlstetter talks about the threat of nuclear weapons today and discusses what can be done to safeguard against the ultimate catastrophe. this is about an hour. >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen, and thank you for joining me today, although i don't have something cheery for you. i was thinking how to start this. wasn't as nice as the very fine english historian who must've been thinking the same thing to write something in today's "wall street journal" opinion page for me, and the title of it is, let's all prepare for the cataclysm. we all think of august as a month where everybody is at the beach, sort of chilling out and all that in this heavily political season, just enjoying life. and for those of us in washington, congress is in recess, which generally speaking means a lot of lobbyists leave town so there's a lot less traffic. it's a rather nice time. robbers wanted to bring us back to a little historical reality, so over the last century among the peaceful events that have occurred, in august of 1914 world war i began. on the last
of a sensational trial had a lot of allegations about judge john walker to district court judge tried to publicize, getting shut down after trying to do that and questions to the propriety of sitting on the case for how he managed to the case. he ultimately ended up coming down to no great surprise is a very broad ruling, finding basically same-sex marriage was mandated by the constitution, so not merely -- [inaudible] >> the right to same-sex marriage. [laughter] that states must under the protection clause allow for same-sex marriage cursor destroy would be brought. if he is right, every state now cannot define their marriage only between a man and a woman. the ninth circuit took that case and came up with a much more narrow ground of which it looks to me as also uniquely tailored to appeal with justice kennedy. judge reinhardt broke a two to one decision upholding it and he basically says, we are not even going to address whether this is a rational basis scrutiny as a matter of itself, but once you have a state where there is a law that already says it's on the books that says you eliminate tha
, you blame the president for congress. i didn't hear you say anything about john boehner. since when does business every guarantee? business is always a risk. so if you're not willing to take the risk, let someone else do it who's willing to take the chance. >> guest: yes, i think there is a lot to go around in terms of congress. you know, john boehner, the speaker of the house also should be providing later shipped to ensure the deal gets done. any mention of bob woodward wrote. i believe rob woodward has interviews with john boehner and the president on how last summer we were all complaining about the debt ceiling debate and it just fell flat. once again is that americans pay in the balance while these guys fight about the amount of taxes were going to pay any amount of spending were going to see. again, here we are one year later waiting for this fiscal class. now in terms of apple, apple has been a very successful company and it makes products people want. but let's not forget something. apple is sitting on some $40 billion of cash on the balance sheet. much of that money is ove
of the conley, john con le's children, conley was the governor of texas. he was wounded. no one knew how seriously at the time, and she went to comfort them. lucy bird was in high school in washington, and if i have this right, she was taken out of class and brought back to the johnson home in washington. >> host: next call for robert caro, cici in portland, oregon. hi. >> caller: hi. i enjoyed your talk. one of the conversations in the talk was about the seven democrats, and i wondered if you could elaborate on the movement towards the republican party after the passage of the civil rights. all of us heard about johnson's quote, i think i just lost the south permanently, the democratic party has, and so i was wondering, then, if you could talk about -- if he, as a political practices, knew that through the passage of the civil rights bills that the south would be lost from the democratic party permanently or, you know, prior to it actually happening and how he was trying to get the bill passed, and he realized that vote would be lost at that time, do you think? >> guest: you have the ca
on by people in silicon valley such as bill gates. >> here's a little taste of donald luskin's, i am john galt, today's heroic innovators building the world and the villainous parasites destroying it. this is booktv. .. >> they operate danced is will not because of the lands it occupied but attacked because of the values and the values of democracy is getting to be interesting but we do follow it with those american values. sometimes too much. you'll find people putting the israeli flag with the american flag. i do not like it. why do people do it? because of democracy and value of the american people. even though we love america we are not america. if you make a mistake you pay a price that you are able to correct it. and we see in the past decisions you do not have to satisfy anyone to the american president word to the un we do not agree with you. if we don't do it but first in the early '80s deciding to attack the nuclear reactor in iraq not popular in the u.s. but we did it and we were condemned by the state department and the when years later people appreciated that decision that he took
high for too long. >> mr. secretary, i am from naval postgraduate school. i may john dewey educated person. my mother mentor typed her way through typing all of his books. giving you where i am coming from. i am a great believer in collaborative learning. in the complex world we live in today, if you are this good in math but don't understand anything else we are losing out on that. one of the things i have observed a lot of public schools is the job is to get the answer. not to ask the right question. my question for you is how do we open up curiosity and allow these kids to challenge and not be penalized because their teachers don't understand the answers? their job is to say where do we go find the answer? but i see things -- everything is silent. getting them to talk horizontal is really hard. i am hoping you will do something about that. starting with kindergarten. >> we are working on it. we are not there yet. a couple things. ultimately questions of what do we value, what skills are we trying to teach and is it the road memorization of facts and you can google anything and le
't they sent in john legend to turn people out. that is happening everywhere. to all states we talk about to in october by each competes differently based on what is basically takes every name of every individual person and they are the turnout targets of louis this persuade double where it goes. >> with everything you know, will there be one case state? if you are interested in? >> to us because they're new two presidential politics it is interesting to see the campaigns to don't have day reflective said of tactics one-party user not equally established to write the presidential campaign. after spending one year you have the most granular familiarity with some of these statistical models but the empirical research of cause and effect i have less and less safe of predictions those who will have very big things but there is a lot in campaigning that that i write about people in politics learned what works and what doesn't people are far more aware of limitations and knowledge and the day are significant. what happens inside elections that is the unknown and anybody that speaks of a two mu
she did. i told -- couldn't even talk. i feel fine. john breaux and blood coming out, i feel fine. and sergeant kuhn comes up and tasered me right away. he is letting me up. i could feel the blood coming out of my mouth. how do you feel now? i couldn't say anything. he told me to run. ago to? and i'm going to run. i am looking for a clearing and when i see clearance between the hyundai and the police officer what i'd do is i get up to go run but this leg when this land was in front of me i didn't know it was broke so the leg when out. when i fell down and looked -- able to make the camera looks like i was going after it because my hands were like this but i was trying to get my hands in front of me. >> host: the video still wasn't running. >> guest: that is when the video had been running maybe 15 seconds. it caught that. what it didn't catch was them name calling and the taser, the juice running 50,000 volts through my body. he did that in three shots and discharge all three shots. when he was doing that these guys are beating me with a baton and telling me to stay still. no way
. the republican party has done, george w. bush, karl rove, john mccain, let's reach out to hispanics and it has become a party that mitt romney -- well, he says that arizona as a model, the dream act that he has a radical policy prescription, health deportation, the idea of making life miserable here and immigrants are little encouraged . this lurch to the right, that strategy means, if you point out in your excellent paper, really, the southwest is out of reach for them in a large part because of this. they are pulled out of new mexico. they had a shock in colorado and nevada. if the turnout is high among latinos, it is not much of one. essentially, the romney strategy has been the economy. cuban-americans in florida, in hopes that we can have just enough of them, because maybe that will be the check, the problem is that even the hispanic electorate has changed. the fastest growing group is the non-latino immigrants who is a litmus test issue. we have part of the latino electorate at stake in a book about all this? would he make of all this? do think this is correct? >> let me just say that i
of voters that are colleges john became group into bills and eight. that is a very quick run through some of the swing states in the 2008 election. maybe it's time for me to step back, catch my breath and just say why is this. why is this going on? why does obama have the lead he does? why is from the having difficulty, and what many people argue should be the core limping along economy and a president that has done so much as the defense and its face it popular at the beginning like the health care reform act and so long, the stimulus looked upon unfavorably by a lot of voters because even though many have felt the economy come back from cataclysmic tester it didn't exactly turn into a picture of health and voters tend to be unforgiving on things like that. what's going on? the first factor is the economy. it's not great now, but it's better than it used to be and i think we are beginning to get the sense that voters are getting credit for how much things have improved relative to a disastrous economic situation in the first year. voters can remember a few years back there some political
's john f. kennedy airport, the congestion in the air space challenges have across places like the metropolitan area and here i am the metropolitan area. all of this site, mr. chairman and certainly two ranking member costello as well, and over the years, you have certainly been passionate about pursuing just real meaningful solutions to these problems as if they had been in your congressional districts across the country and we certainly appreciate that as an industry. your palate hearings, conduct of information on sessions and have an open door as he sought not to assign blame, but in terms of driving a shorter path to progress in the future. for the past years as chairman of the faa's nexgen advisory committee. i thank you and i'm wearing two hats today. that is in the rover chairman as well as ceo at jet airways. on the sub three advisory committee come all soon conclude my 2-year-old weary bruce group of leaders from across the world does both volunteered that. we provide consensus-based recommendations on complex policy issues and response to specific questions they pres
and the position of folks like lindsey graham or john mccain than there is between romney and obama. both romney and obama believe in supporting the opposition. the administration has provided nonlethal and humanitarian assistance, it's also worked with our allies who are providing all sorts of support to the opposition which, by the way, is what mitt romney said he would do in working with countries like qatar, turkey and saudi arabia and other ways. but i think this administration has also recognized that the most important thing we can do is try to create a unified political opposition so that when the assad regime fall, we'll have as smooth a transition as possible. rushing in with military options without a clear exit strategy which, by the way, mitt romney said on "60 minutes" would be the way he would think about military affairs, the president understands we have to be cautious about it. because there are many ways in which we could make the situation worse rather than better, and our first obligation is to try and get the political and diplomatic context right so you can have as smooth
's an example that john deere company embarked upon a pilot project in africa were developed a suite of form tools that could be attached to a very small tractor. then the company worked to expand the availability of capital to the farmers are there so they could maintain and develop their own businesses. the result is that a good investment for john deere, and a greater opportunity are african farmers who are now able to grow more crops, and provide far more plentiful lives of their own. for american foreign aid to become more effective, it's got to embrace the principles that you see in these global initiatives. the power of partnerships, access to the transformative nature of free enterprise, and the leverage of the abundant resources that can come from the private sector. now i believe that there are three quite legitimate objects of our foreign aid in this country. first of course is to address the humanitarian needs. such as the case with a far, which is given medical treatment to millions suffering from hiv and aids. second is to foster a substantial united states strategic interest,
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